Posts Tagged ‘LEED Gold’



980 Howe open for business in downtown Vancouver

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The new Manulife Office Tower in downtown Vancouver at 980 Howe had its grand opening just a few weeks ago.

Designed by HDR | CEI Architecture Associates and Endall Elliot Associates, the highly sustainable 16-storey building is a model of clean, contemporary office design. The facility provides 245,000 square feet of leasable office space in downtown Vancouver.

Elegant contemporary design
“The client challenged us to create an all-glass curtain wall building,” said Alan Endall, architect and principal with Endall Elliot Associates.

The design team wasn’t sure that was possible at first, as an all-glass curtain wall structure would have a hard time achieving the energy efficiency standards required for the project, which is targeting LEED Gold.

“The team responded with an all-glass design that incorporates innovative features to reduce solar heat gain and ensure energy efficiency, while preserving transparency and a sense of openness,” said John Scott, Vice President of HDR | CEI.

A limited material palette and a subtle layering of light colours and textures helps the building achieve a simple, almost minimalist expression that contrasts with the more heavily articulated and solid buildings in the neighbourhood.

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Sustainable features abound
The design uses a triple-glazed curtain wall throughout the structure. Triple-glazing—essentially three panes of glass separated by argon gas—offers better insulation than the more common double-glazing. It also provides additional surfaces for low-e coating, which prevents interior heat loss and mitigates solar heat gain.

To address how light and shadow affect the building, the design team studied the position of the sun at different times of the day and during each season. This led to the use of ceramic frit patterns—ceramic baked onto the glass—with subtle variations in glass colour and patterning on the four orientations of the building to address the different amount of sun and shadow that each frontage gets.

The design team used a highly transparent low-iron glass on lower floors of the Howe Street facade, since that face tends to be in the shade and solar gain is not as much of an issue.

“It was another way that we were able to vary the appearance of the all-glass building along that frontage,” noted Endall.

Continuing the minimalist theme, interior finishes are kept simple, with white marble on columns and walls, granite paving, and wood introduced in the ceiling to help create warmth in the lobby.

“The entrance lobby is an important aspect of the interiors,” said Scott. “We introduced a double-height linear entry lobby with low-iron glass and structural glazing along the street to facilitate transparency.”

Building amenities include a fitness centre and a common meeting room on the penthouse level.

Additional sustainable features include:

  • A combination of high performance building envelope, high efficiency mechanical systems, heat recovery and lighting technologies limit energy use.
  • End-of-trip cycling facilities with ample covered bike parking, showers and change rooms
  • Preferred parking and charging stations for electric vehicles.
  • Landscaping strategies with rain gardens, boulevard structural soil trenches providing a reservoir to support shade trees, public education, and art celebrating water management.
  • Plantings featuring native species and hardy west coast plants to minimize maintenance and pest management.
  • The project mitigates the “heat island” effect by placing parking underground, incorporating street trees and plantings to help cool building surfaces, and using light-coloured landscape materials, both at the ground plane and roof level.

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LEED Gold plaque unveiled in North Vancouver

From Left: Kim Gosteli, National Director, Sales and Marketing, CEI Architecture; John Scott, Partner-in-Charge, CEI Architecture; Darrel Mussatto, Mayor of City of North Vancouver; Jane Watkins, Chief Librarian; Shervin Shahriari,Library Board Chair

From Left: Kim Gosteli, National Director, Sales and Marketing, CEI Architecture; John Scott, Partner-in-Charge, CEI Architecture; Darrell Mussatto, Mayor of North Vancouver; Jane Watkins, Chief Librarian; Shervin Shahriari, Library Board Chair


The North Vancouver City Library has recently been awarded LEED Gold certification by the Canada Green Building Council. On Tuesday, May 12, North Vancouver Mayor, Darrell Mussatto, unveiled the LEED Gold plaque which will now be a permanent reminder of the facility’s environmental stewardship.

“The Library is one of only four buildings on the North Shore to receive LEED Canada Gold certification,” says Mayor Mussatto. “This certification demonstrates our commitment to ensuring a more sustainable future for City residents. By incorporating green building practices into our community’s civic buildings, we are actively creating a sustainable future.”

The Library was designed by Diamond Schmitt Architects in a joint venture with CEI. The building, which was designed and constructed with LEED certification in mind from the onset of the project, opened its doors in September 2008. In this time, the three-storey building has become a popular destination for city residents, and is often a venue for community events.

The Library’s infrastructure contains several sustainable features that helped it to achieve the certification, such as radiant heating and cooling, solar panels, low flush toilets, and solar shading. Individuals wishing to learn more about the facility’s green components are encouraged to participate in a Sustainability Tour that takes every month. More information can be found here.



North Vancouver City Library earns LEED Gold certification

Landmark public facility incorporates energy efficiency and environmentally friendly features


Designed by CEI Architecture and Diamond Schmitt Architects in joint venture, the North Vancouver City Library features a variety of design elements that contribute to a small environmental footprint.

“From the very beginning the goal of the project was to provide North Vancouver with a facility that would support the values of this community,” said John Scott, partner in charge with CEI Architecture. “Designing a highly sustainable building was a big part of that vision.”

The 36,000-square-foot library getsa portion of the energy needed for its heating system through solar panels on the roof. A combination of geo-exchange heating and cooling, as well as solar energy, delivers the energy needs of the library and services the Central Lonsdale Power Plant. High efficiency boilers support heating requirements at peak times for the library and the surrounding neighbourhood.

The North Vancouver City Library has won many awards for its contributions to the community and positive impact on the urban environment. It has been honoured by the BC Library Association, the City of North Vancouver Advisory Design Panel, and the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, among others.

To learn more about the project, please visit the project page.



BC Cancer Centre for the North awarded LEED Gold


BC Cancer_001webThe BC Cancer Agency Centre for the North has been awarded LEED Gold status by the Canada Green Building Council. The facility, located in Prince George BC, was completed in September 2012, designed and built using the public-private partnership (“P3”) delivery method. CEI Architecture led the design of the project, working with PCL Constructors and Plenary Health.

The project was designed to the climatic demands of its location in Prince George, BC, a community in central British Columbia and an 800 km drive north of Vancouver. The city has a fairly wide temperature swing: from average lows of twelve degrees below zero in January to average highs of over 20 degrees Celsius in July. The Cancer Centre had to be designed to accommodate this dynamic climate using an energy efficient and environmentally respectful approach that reflects the facility’s mandate to improve the health of the region.

The Centre for the North was acknowledged for “exemplary performance” in regional material sourcing; 38% of building materials (by cost) came from sources nearby.

Its other sustainable features are numerous.

The Centre for the North was built using 655,000 board feet of wood, reflecting the importance of the material to the region and wood’s lower carbon footprint compared to other building materials. Over 50% of the wood-based products used in the building are certified by the Forest Stewardship Council, which includes interior finishes, exterior siding, and structural wood columns and beams.

Energy-efficient lighting is used inside and outside, and high-performance windows control the energy needed to heat and cool the building. Occupancy and daylight sensors turn off the lights automatically in areas that are not being used or that have sufficient daylight from neighbouring windows.

An outdoor healing garden is located at the ground floor. The garden has space to sit and relax and also offers a covered smudging pavilion for patient and family use. The vegetation is native to its region, and many of the plants were selected by First Nations traditional healers from the region for their healing characteristics.

The design included a rooftop garden and a white, reflective roof on portions of the top of the mechanical room. Both roof elements reflect sunlight and reduce the amount of energy needed to cool the building in the summer. The rooftop garden is made up of local plants and provides several other benefits to the building including capturing rainwater, providing insulation, and offering staff and visitors a nice place to relax while enjoying the views.

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Tommy Douglas Library achieves LEED Gold

CEI Architecture is proud to announce that Burnaby’s Tommy Douglas Library has officially achieved LEED Gold certification. This project joins our growing portfolio of sustainable projects including WIllingdon Park Phases 8 and 9, and the University of Victoria Administrative Services Building, both of which have recently achieved LEED Gold.




Open for class at NW Community College Smithers campus

Smithers Interior News reported that their CEI Architecture-designed expansion and renovation of the Smithers Campus of Northwest Community College is open for classes.

Says the article:

“Now the campus is wheelchair accessible, with expanded learning facilities and improved video conferencing. There are also new labs and shops for trades programs.”

The new facility will not only increase the capacity and functionality of the Smithers campus, but provides the greater community with a place to come together. Special focus was placed on designing a welcoming entrance area, which is a two-storey space. The new two-storey addition is designed around a galleria space that brings natural light into the interior of the building and aids natural ventilation through its location.

Flexibility was an essential design objective, to allow Northwest Community College to evolve and adapt its program needs over time. The space includes a flexible workshop, capacity to accommodate moving transportable classrooms, and a host of advanced post-secondary learning spaces.

The LEED Gold design is tailored to the context and climate of the region, with a host of sustainable features that will help the contemporary facility function in all seasons. The design includes significant use of heavy timber, supporting the Government of B.C.’s Wood-First initiative.