Posts Tagged ‘Sustainability’



Okanagan College Centre of Excellence achieves LEED Platinum certification


The Jim Pattison Centre of Excellence in Sustainable Building Technologies and Renewable Energy Conservation at Okanagan College has been certified LEED Platinum.

Since its completion in 2011, the post-secondary facility has been recognized as one of the most innovative and sustainable education facilities anywhere.

Designed by CEI Architecture, built by PCL Constructors Westcoast, and with sustainable consulting by Recollecting Consulting, the 7,000-square-metre facility provides trades and technology training and professional development with a focus on sustainable practices and the use of alternative and renewable energy.

It was one of three buildings in North America featured by the New York Times Knowledge Network as leading examples of carbon-neutral campus architecture, and has received honours from the Canadian Green Building Council, the Green Good Design Awards, the Applied Science and Technologists and Technicians of BC, and many more.

“The Centre of Excellence is truly an innovative facility, providing leading edge training in sustainable practices for Okanagan College,” said Bill Locking, senior partner with CEI Architecture.“The integrated nature of the design and construction team enabled the Centre of Excellence to achieve ambitious targets for sustainable design. We couldn’t be more proud to have been part of the project.”

The Centre of Excellence is also pursuing certification under the Living Building Challenge, one of the most rigorous measures of sustainability for the built environment. The two-storey building incorporates a variety of integrated energy efficiency and sustainable design features to minimize its impact on the environment.

“The Centre of Excellence is a truly green project and an inspiring model of what can be. The elegant combination of simple passive strategies and complex mechanical systems shows the way forward for the built environment,” said Jason Packer of Recollective Consulting. “It is a pedagogic building, supporting the growth of capacity in the green building trades through the education programs it houses and the growth of the green building design community as a case study in conservation.

“It is great to see the project rewarded with a LEED Platinum certification.”

For more information about this innovative facility, visit the project website at or click here.




LEED Gold plaque unveiled in North Vancouver

From Left: Kim Gosteli, National Director, Sales and Marketing, CEI Architecture; John Scott, Partner-in-Charge, CEI Architecture; Darrel Mussatto, Mayor of City of North Vancouver; Jane Watkins, Chief Librarian; Shervin Shahriari,Library Board Chair

From Left: Kim Gosteli, National Director, Sales and Marketing, CEI Architecture; John Scott, Partner-in-Charge, CEI Architecture; Darrell Mussatto, Mayor of North Vancouver; Jane Watkins, Chief Librarian; Shervin Shahriari, Library Board Chair


The North Vancouver City Library has recently been awarded LEED Gold certification by the Canada Green Building Council. On Tuesday, May 12, North Vancouver Mayor, Darrell Mussatto, unveiled the LEED Gold plaque which will now be a permanent reminder of the facility’s environmental stewardship.

“The Library is one of only four buildings on the North Shore to receive LEED Canada Gold certification,” says Mayor Mussatto. “This certification demonstrates our commitment to ensuring a more sustainable future for City residents. By incorporating green building practices into our community’s civic buildings, we are actively creating a sustainable future.”

The Library was designed by Diamond Schmitt Architects in a joint venture with CEI. The building, which was designed and constructed with LEED certification in mind from the onset of the project, opened its doors in September 2008. In this time, the three-storey building has become a popular destination for city residents, and is often a venue for community events.

The Library’s infrastructure contains several sustainable features that helped it to achieve the certification, such as radiant heating and cooling, solar panels, low flush toilets, and solar shading. Individuals wishing to learn more about the facility’s green components are encouraged to participate in a Sustainability Tour that takes every month. More information can be found here.



North Vancouver City Library earns LEED Gold certification

Landmark public facility incorporates energy efficiency and environmentally friendly features


Designed by CEI Architecture and Diamond Schmitt Architects in joint venture, the North Vancouver City Library features a variety of design elements that contribute to a small environmental footprint.

“From the very beginning the goal of the project was to provide North Vancouver with a facility that would support the values of this community,” said John Scott, partner in charge with CEI Architecture. “Designing a highly sustainable building was a big part of that vision.”

The 36,000-square-foot library getsa portion of the energy needed for its heating system through solar panels on the roof. A combination of geo-exchange heating and cooling, as well as solar energy, delivers the energy needs of the library and services the Central Lonsdale Power Plant. High efficiency boilers support heating requirements at peak times for the library and the surrounding neighbourhood.

The North Vancouver City Library has won many awards for its contributions to the community and positive impact on the urban environment. It has been honoured by the BC Library Association, the City of North Vancouver Advisory Design Panel, and the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, among others.

To learn more about the project, please visit the project page.



CEI celebrates its third Tommie win

CEI’s design of the Glenmore Landfill Administration Building won Gold at the 2014 Tommie Awards this past weekend.

Glenmore Landfill_001-LR

The Canadian Home Builders’ Association of the Central Okanagan honoured the facility as the best in the Commercial/Retail/Office category. Projects were judged on their sustainable and landscape features and innovative design. 

The Glenmore project demonstrates how a modern office environment can successfully function using significantly less energy, exploiting alternate fuels sources such as landfill gas, and elegantly incorporating a wide range of recycled materials—all within a constrained conventional budget. 

The Glenmore Landfill Administration Building joins CEI’s previous TOMMIE Gold winning projects including The Wine Experience Centre and Elenko Residence project.



BC Cancer Centre for the North awarded LEED Gold


BC Cancer_001webThe BC Cancer Agency Centre for the North has been awarded LEED Gold status by the Canada Green Building Council. The facility, located in Prince George BC, was completed in September 2012, designed and built using the public-private partnership (“P3”) delivery method. CEI Architecture led the design of the project, working with PCL Constructors and Plenary Health.

The project was designed to the climatic demands of its location in Prince George, BC, a community in central British Columbia and an 800 km drive north of Vancouver. The city has a fairly wide temperature swing: from average lows of twelve degrees below zero in January to average highs of over 20 degrees Celsius in July. The Cancer Centre had to be designed to accommodate this dynamic climate using an energy efficient and environmentally respectful approach that reflects the facility’s mandate to improve the health of the region.

The Centre for the North was acknowledged for “exemplary performance” in regional material sourcing; 38% of building materials (by cost) came from sources nearby.

Its other sustainable features are numerous.

The Centre for the North was built using 655,000 board feet of wood, reflecting the importance of the material to the region and wood’s lower carbon footprint compared to other building materials. Over 50% of the wood-based products used in the building are certified by the Forest Stewardship Council, which includes interior finishes, exterior siding, and structural wood columns and beams.

Energy-efficient lighting is used inside and outside, and high-performance windows control the energy needed to heat and cool the building. Occupancy and daylight sensors turn off the lights automatically in areas that are not being used or that have sufficient daylight from neighbouring windows.

An outdoor healing garden is located at the ground floor. The garden has space to sit and relax and also offers a covered smudging pavilion for patient and family use. The vegetation is native to its region, and many of the plants were selected by First Nations traditional healers from the region for their healing characteristics.

The design included a rooftop garden and a white, reflective roof on portions of the top of the mechanical room. Both roof elements reflect sunlight and reduce the amount of energy needed to cool the building in the summer. The rooftop garden is made up of local plants and provides several other benefits to the building including capturing rainwater, providing insulation, and offering staff and visitors a nice place to relax while enjoying the views.

BC Cancer_007web



CEI’s Robert Parlane presents at Rethink Landfill

On Thursday, November 21 at 5 pm, CEI Architecture’s Robert Parlane will be part of a presentation on the Glenmore Landfill Administration Building at Rethink Landfill, part of the Building the Future Speakers Series,

Robert Parlane and Trevor Butler, of Integral Group, will explore how a modern administration centre for the Glenmore Landfill addresses sustainability through regenerative design, environmental footprint, holistic solutions and industrial ecology. Specifically, they will consider how the building incorporates innovative technologies such as composting toilets and earth tubes, and uses landfill methane as the primary energy source.

The building, designed by CEI Architecture, was recently honoured with a Community Recognition Award by the Canadian Wood Council and Wood WORKS! BC.

The event is hosted by the Okanagan Institute. Click here to register.

Robert Parlane joined CEI Architecture in 2009. He has led several projects of significant sustainable ambition, including the Jim Pattison Centre of Excellence at Okanagan College, designed to the rigorous standards of the Living Building Challenge. Originally from Bath, England, he has lived with his family in Kelowna for over ten years.

Rethink Landfill takes place at the Bohemian Cafe, 524 Bernard Avenue, Kelowna. This marks the 261st event the Okanagan Institute has held since 2007. The Building the Future Speakers Series is presented by the Cascadia Green Building Council, CoCo Laboratory and RAIC Centre for Architecture at Athabaska University in association with the Okanagan Institute.



CEI Architecture named Western Living Designers of the Year 2013 in the Eco Category


CEI Architecture couldn’t be more pleased to be named Eco Designer of the Year by Western Living Magazine. The achievement comes as part of the publication’s annual Designers of the Year awards, which will be featured in their upcoming September issue.

CEI was selected on the strength of such projects as the Vernon Library, Road 13 Winery, Black Hills Estate Wine Experience Centre and the Jim Pattison Centre of Excellence at Okanagan College.

Along with sustainable design, the awards showcase innovations in fashion, interiors, architecture and industrial design throughout Western Canada, with CEI finding itself in some very impressive company. Fellow award-winners include the non-profit fashion line Obakki, and North Vancouver-based artist, sculptor and furniture designer Brent Comber.

To read more about this year’s award winners, along with an in-depth interview with CEI Principal Nick Bevanda, pick-up the September issue of Western Living magazine or visit them online at



CEI Architecture a finalist in Western Living’s 2013 Designers of the Year

DOTY13_FinalistWebBadge_Eco DOTY13_FinalistWebBadge_ArchitectureCEI Architecture was recently named as a finalist in Western Living‘s 2013 Designers of the Year. We were named to the shortlist in both the Architecture category and the Eco Design category, which emphasizes smart, sustainable design of buildings.

CEI was selected to the shortlist on the strength of recent projects such as the Black Hills Estate Wine Experience Centre, Okanagan Regional Library—Vernon Branch, Jim Pattison Centre of Excellence in Sustainable Building Technologies at Okanagan College, Smyth-Lefebvre Residence, Terravista Vineyards, and more.

The winners will be announced Monday, August 26 and will be profiled in the September issue.




Ground breaks at Manulife building at 980 Howe Street


Construction has begun on Manulife Real Estate’s new downtown Vancouver office building, designed by CEI Architecture and Endall Elliot Associates.

The 16-storey, 250,000 square foot building will be targeting LEED Gold Certification, a feature that attracted Steve Hedberg, President and CEO of international engineering consulting firm, and future lead tenant, BGC. “We are looking forward to growing with Manulife at 980 Howe Street, especially being able to offer lifestyle choices in a sustainable, efficient working environment to our staff.”

Features such as a rooftop garden, on-site conference facility, fitness centre, and its close proximity to Robson Square, the Vancouver Art Gallery and the Law Courts, add to the building’s appeal.

Completion of 980 Howe Street is planned for spring of 2015. More details and project renderings can be found here.



LED technology: A bright idea.

Athletic Business Magazine discussed the benefits of using LED lighting in pool facilities in their July issue and included CEI Architecture’s design of Edmonds Pool and Community Centre as a case study. 

Though LED (light-emitting diode) fixtures are about twice the price as incandescent bulbs initially, their superior efficiency and long-term return on investment has spiked popularity. Similarly, LED lights outlast traditional alternatives, cutting replacement and maintenance costs, while also providing new design opportunities.

“Usually what happens is you’re doing backstroke and you’re looking up at the ceiling, and if you have ceiling beams, that’s what people follow to stay inline,” says CEI’s Mary Chow. “We suggested that horizontal bars be dropped down and fitted with LED lights that run parallel to the lanes.” By eliminating the costs associated with changing overhead bulbs, swimmers will now follow an LED-lit path to the finish line.

CEI Architecture also utilized underwater colour-change LED lights in the lap pool, a fun feature to benefit the many youth programs scheduled for the Centre.